Beagle Channel in the Patagonia

Beagle Channel in the Patagonia

June 08, 2013

ANCIENT AGRICULTURAL INNOVATIONS IN THE PERUVIAN ANDES OF SPANISH AMERICA






WELCOME TO THIS POST!  IT’S THE FTSF BLOG HOP!


SOME LOVELY FLOWERS AT OLLANTAYTAMBO GARDENS, PERU

These flowers grow on the fertile Andean terraces!


Click to enlarge



Source: McKay Savage, CC BY 2.0.Wikimedia Commons 


MORE FLOWERS! 


Same place.

 Click to enlarge


Source: McKay Savage. CC BY 2.0. Wikimedia Commons

THE PROMPT



I hit a turning point in my life when I … went to work in rural schools.



THE CAUSE AND THE EFFECTS



At one moment I was a relatively successful, highly trained academic, working in a high-level position at the Faculty of Education of my home-town University, the University of Concepcion, Chile.


Then suddenly I was out of work, desperately looking for a job (any job!), and signing on as the Director of a rural school in a small, rather unimportant and very poor community, hidden away quite far from the urban centers where I had lived up to then.


I ended up making a new career for myself which involved 22 years of directing rural schools in godforsaken places.


It was a fascinating experience, and it changed my outlook in so many ways, I couldn’t even begin to describe them.


It is probably one of the main factors for my ongoing interest in the pre-Columbian civilizations of Spanish America, as they were all highly involved in agricultural innovations.


They also spent a lot of time and effort studying the cosmological principles that rule the ever repeating cycle of the seasons.


AND MORE FLOWERS!

Click to enlarge


Source: McKay Savage, CC BY 2.0. Wikimedia Commons



ANCIENT AGRICULTURAL INNOVATIONS IN THE HIGH ANDES MOUNTAINS OF PERU



SOME INITIAL IDEAS




In the face of the threat of global climate change, modern agro ecologists are rediscovering the fact that many of the pre-Columbian cultures in Spanish America evolved through the development of quite sophisticated agricultural procedures.


This has become ever more important as annual rain falls vary dramatically and glaziers continue to shrink and recede.


The International Panel on Climatic Change (IPCC) has recognized Peru as the world’s third most vulnerable country to climatic change. This fact has stimulated an ongoing interest in ancient indigenous Andean agriculture, as a means of providing solutions for the preservation of soil and the better distribution of the ever more scarce provision of available water.


Specifically in the Peru-Bolivian Andean slopes and Antiplano (plateau), there are two distinct ancient systems that are being revived at present will the help of international research projects.


  • The raised fields or waru-waru of the Titicaca region

  • The andenes or terraces built on the steep Andean hillsides


In my post on the Tiwanaku civilization in Bolivia, I have a short reference to the “raised fields” agriculture. (See my post).


In this present post I want to provide some facts about the terraces, specifically about those built by the Wari population that flourished in the 6th century, and the subsequent development of this technique by the Inca.

ANDENES AT PISAC


Click to enlarge


Source: McKay Savage, CC BY 2.0. Wikimedia Commons

STEEP ANDENES AT PISAC 

There are small steps that wind up the walls of the Andenes





Click to enlarge


Source: McKay Savage, CC BY 2.0. Wikimedia Commons



SOLUTIONS FOR A COMPLEX GEOGRAPHY



The rivers that flow down from the steep Andes mountains to the Peruvian coast form narrow valleys at an average altitude of 500 meters. These very narrow and deep valleys do not allow for large scale agricultural production.


The ancient inhabitants of these Andean regions provided for a greater surface of arable land through the construction of the andenes. These beautifully engineered structures consisted of layers and layers of terraces with the most fantastic irrigation systems that used mile long canals to distribute water to the terraces. In this way, food was provided for a population of hundreds of thousands.


Today these beautiful structures have fallen into disrepair, and many inhabitants have emigrated to the already overcrowded cities lower down near the coast.


At present, and with the help of international research centers and also international resources, some of these structures are being rebuilt.


The projects also include reverting to the traditional crops that were originally planted on the terraces. The yields for potatoes on the reconstructed terraces have been amazing!


The Andean grain crops are also being used, such as quinoa and kiwicha. 

These are planted in association with maize (corn) so as to reduce losses cause by pest attacks. The experimental areas that have been set up in recent years and that use the ancient systems have proved that no chemical fertilizers are needed; the levels of dampness provided by the slow irrigation cause the organic matter to break down and to recycle.


In addition, the irrigation canals store the heat of the day and liberate it gradually during the night, which contributes to combat frosts.


This then is genuine organic agriculture!


SOME INCREDIBLE WATER CHANNELS 

This one actually works, the water is flowing!


Click to enlarge


Source: McKasy Savage, CC BY 2.0. Wikimedia Commons


THE ELABORATE WATER CHANNELS, AN OUTLET!




Click to enlarge


Source: McKay Savage, CC BY 2.0. Wikimedia Commons


THE STRUCTURES ARE SO FERTILE!




Click to enlarge


 Source: McKay Savage, CC BY 2.0. Wikimedia Commons



FINAL WORDS



One of the leading institutions involved in this rebirth of the Andean agricultural practices using the terraces,is the Cusichaca Trust. It has received funding from Britain’s Department for International Development.


There are also numerous NGO’s also involved in this ongoing effort, and I find it all so very fascinating!


If I had not gone to work in rural areas when I desperately needed a job, I would never have learnt to appreciate the intricacies and fascination of these topics.


At present I am fully aware of the implications of global climatic change, and the threats to our familiar life styles.


I am very thankful for this wider vision on my part; I look back at my younger self and find myself to have been somewhat too narrowly focused on the more urban aspects of my reality. 


I think I am now a better person for the experience.


CLOSE-UP OF AN ANDEN 

The steps up the sides of the walls can be seen!

 

Click to enlarge


Source: McKay Savage, CC BY 2.0. Wikimedia Commons



ANDENES, LONG AND CURVED


 Click to enlarge

Source: Benutzer Torox, CC BY SA 3.0. Wikimedia Commons

 

FABULOUS WATER CHANNELING


Click to enlarge


  Source: McKay Savage, CC BY 2.0. Flickr



SPANISH VERSION





(This Blog is bilingual)



En este post me refiero a una experiencia que cambió mi vida, cuando por razones de trabajo, me vi obligada a abandonar el ambiente urbano donde transcurría mi vida como académica de la Universidad de Concepción. 


En efecto, cuando asumí como Directora de un colegio situado en una pequeña comunidad rural, bastante pobre y aislada, nunca imaginé que pasaría 22 años en los sectores rurales y que terminaría labrándome otra carrera totalmente distinta a la que había llevado hasta entonces. ¡Fue una experiencia fascinante!


Mi forma de percibir y de interpretar los hechos cambió radicalmente y probablemente también fomentó mi interés por las antiguas culturas pre-Hispánicas.


Estas antiguas civilizaciones crearon muchas innovaciones en los temas agrícolas y también dedicaron muchos esfuerzos al conocimiento de los ciclos de las estaciones. 



LAS ANTIGUAS PRACTICAS AGRICOLAS EN LAS ALTAS MONTAÑAS ANDINAS DEL PERU.



IDEAS INICIALES.



Las amenazas del cambio climático han llevado a los agro-ecologistas modernos a reconsiderar la importancia que tuvieron las antiguas tecnologías introducidas en las prácticas agrícolas para el desarrollo de las culturas pre-Colombinas de la América Hispana.


Estos estudios se han hecho cada vez más importantes frente a la disminución en la cantidad de lluvia caída anualmente y  las dramáticas disminuciones en las superficies de los hielos de los glaciares, los cuales retroceden cada vez más. 


Frente a los estudios que indican que el Perú es altamente vulnerable al cambio climático, se ha producido un creciente interés en las prácticas de la agricultura Andina como un medio para preservar el suelo y para entregar una mejor distribución del agua.


Los dos sistemas antiguos que se intentan revivir son los siguientes:

  • Las “camas altas” o waru-waru de la región del Lago Titicaca

  • Los andenes o terrazas de las empinadas laderas de los montes Andinos.


En mi post sobre Tiwanaku me referí muy brevemente a los primeros, y en este post pretendo referirme a los andenes, especialmente a aquellos construidos por la civilización Wari y perfeccionado posteriormente por los Inca.



SOLUCIONES PARA UNA COMPLEJA GEOGRAFIA



Los ríos que fluyen desde lo alto de las empinadas montañas de los Andes hasta las costas de Perú han formado angostos valles que a la vez son muy profundos. Estos valles no permiten el desarrollo de una agricultura muy extensiva.


Los antiguos habitantes de estas regiones lograron crear mayores superficies cultivables mediante la construcción de andenes o terrazas.

Estas bellísimas obras de ingeniería consistían en numerosas hileras de terrazas provistas de sistemas de irrigación absolutamente increíbles. 

Mediante kilómetros de canales se distribuía el agua a las terrazas. De esta forma pudieron proveer de alimentos a cientos de miles de habitantes.


En la actualidad estas maravillosas estructuras se han deteriorado por el desuso y muchos habitantes han emigrado a las ya sobresaturadas zonas urbanas más cercanas a las costas.


Con el aporte y la participación de diversas organizaciones internacionales, se están reconstruyendo algunas de estas terrazas.


También se ha decidió volver a las plantaciones tradicionales, cultivando la papa, la quínoa y la kiwicha. Los rindes en las zonas experimentales ¡han sido realmente espectaculares!


El uso de los antiguos sistemas ha demostrado que no se necesitan fertilizantes químicos ya que el material orgánico que actúa como fertilizante se recicla solo. 


Además, los canales almacenan el calor del día en los cuerpos de agua y liberan lentamente este calor durante la noche. De esta manera, se evitan los negativos resultados de las escarchas.


¡Esto sí que es agricultura orgánica!



PALABRAS FINALES



Una de las instituciones que lideran estos estudios para volver a desarrollar las antiguas prácticas agrícolas de las poblaciones Andinas, es el Cusichaca Trust, que recibe fondos desde Gran Bretaña.


Hay también numerosas ONG que se han involucrado en estos esfuerzos, y en lo personal encuentro que estas iniciativas ¡son todas fascinantes!


Si no hubiera trabajado en los sectores rurales de mi región probablemente nunca habría logrado apreciar estas maravillas.


En la actualidad tengo plena conciencia de las implicancias del cambio climático y creo tener también una visión más amplia sobre muchos otros aspectos relacionados.


Considero que soy una mejor persona ¡gracias a estas vivencias!





More about similar topics in a future post.    Más sobre temas similares en un próximo post.





LANGUAGE TIPS FOR ENGLISH



Words that go together!  *  Do the housework  - * Make dinner   - * Come to a standstill    

  



LANGUAGE TIPS FOR SPANISH.



Expresiones de uso frecuente: * El saber no ocupa lugar - * El sol brilla para todos   - *  La plata llama la plata





How is your level of comprehension?   ¿Cómo está su nivel de comprensión?





© 2013  joanveronica  (Joan Robertson)





I will be very happy to receive your comments! Just click the word “comments” lower down.